Fishermen, Fishermen

[Skudge White]


Buy Vinyl

You don’t get much more “techno” than Skudge. Let’s run through the list: vinyl-only label, reserved solely for own work? Check. (Well, Phantom came out on CD, but you get the point). Analog gear fetish? Check. Reclusive, mysterious reputation? Check. In hindsight, predicting the arrival of their latest venture, Skudge White, probably wasn’t too hard — it’s simply the final piece in the archetypal puzzle. The label’s inaugural release sees Martin Skogehall (aka MRSK) team up with a friend for the eponymous Fishermen. As we’ve come to expect from Skudge and their associates, it offers a singularly robust take on techno, packing five varied tracks onto one 12″. There are five because they’re short and sweet, the longest clocking in at 5:03. Somehow, though, nothing ever feels rushed.

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

The piercing, Oscar Mulero-like bleeps of “Dhow,” for instance, take their time to rise from a tangle of scrubby drums and chords, before crashing spectacularly back into the undergrowth. Similarly, the see-sawing synths which dominate “Anchor Buoy” blossom at only the most languid of speeds. The key to this short-but-exciting thing seems to be single motifs. Each cut has just one, heavy drums and varying types of distortion swirling about to make things feel more complex than they really are. It works well. “Blood Knot” uses a manic organ for its centerpiece, slipping it deftly through the roar of stamping machinery. In “Ribbonfish,” two half themes are locked together, ghostly howls and thickly-corrugated chords causing massive damage. “Isopod” might have shared a similar intensity, but for the bleak and beautiful undercurrent audible beneath its didgeridoo-like 303 and industrialized electro beats. Like Rivet’s work, the effort invested in all of these sounds is readily apparent; none feel overly familiar. Ultimately, it’s this quality which keeps each lone motif (plus its surroundings) exciting, and consequently, renders Fisherman an incredibly strong start for Skudge White.

Adam Lundberg // Geography Records  on October 25, 2012 at 1:25 AM

Great record! Dhow sounds like Audions old Suckfish-album, in a very good way.

Adam  on October 25, 2012 at 9:27 AM

Skudge is not vinyl only anymore. I wonder about this release though.

bla bla bla  on October 25, 2012 at 2:16 PM

This is a vinyl only series.

littlewhiteearbuds  on October 25, 2012 at 2:19 PM

^ FYI this guys knows what he’s talking about.

Iain Wax Works  on November 2, 2012 at 8:07 AM

Best Skudge record I’ve heard in a while, was growing tired of their tunes tbh. Seemed to all adhere to a similar template.

Shame the tracks aren’t a little longer.

Trackbacks

LWE Podcast 189: Fishermen – Little White Earbuds  on January 13, 2014 at 12:02 AM

[…] in October 2012, Skudge opened a new sub-label, Skudge White. Its first record, the simply-titled Fishermen seemed like perfect fodder for Skudge’s usual blackout tactics. For one, nobody had ever […]

LWE Podcast 189: Fishermen | electronic podcastselectronic podcasts  on January 14, 2014 at 12:11 AM

[…] in October 2012, Skudge opened a new sub-label, Skudge White. Its first record, the simply-titled Fishermen seemed like perfect fodder for Skudge’s usual blackout tactics. For one, nobody had ever […]

LWE Podcast 189: Fishermen | Baring souls with insane music  on January 15, 2014 at 7:32 AM

[…] in October 2012, Skudge opened a new sub-label, Skudge White. Its first record, the simply-titled Fishermen seemed like perfect fodder for Skudge’s usual blackout tactics. For one, nobody had ever heard […]

Your email is never shared. Required fields are marked *

*
*