Move D, The KM20 Tapes (1992–1996)

[Off Minor Recordings]


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Move D has, over the course of nearly two decades, made his share of timeless music. By that I do not mean his discography has been graced with a constant stream of grandiose, game-changing tracks of virtuoso complexity. It’s more that he has spent time honing effortless and deeply human grooves that stand up, connect, and move a floor time and again. Often it’s music of this simple, honest intent and elegant delivery that ends up delivering the most prolonged listener kinship, and this hitherto unheard EP really is a case in point. On the sophomore release from Jordan Czamanski’s new Off Minor imprint, David Moufang dusts off five archival tracks originally recorded at his KM20 studio in Heidelberg between 1992 and 96. Ragged, acidic, homespun, and moving, they not only stand up, but also sound startlingly, thrillingly fresh, especially when taken in the context of the current crop of loose, DIY house jams.

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“Kriek – Animals” opens the proceedings. A dubby vignette comprising loose ascending notes and submerged ping-pong hats, the movement of the track is faltering, with stumbling notation providing a sense of tripped-out space motion. “Ovi Riese,” meanwhile, is a heads-down, lo-fi acid belter that could have come out on L.I.E.S, like, tomorrow. Squelching, tuned-down 303, kicks driven to the point of distortion and strange pad maneuvers give the piece a sense of after-party belligerence; a hissing chug that will reignite jaded feet and addled brains. “Ground Zero” is a more experimental jam, hinging on repetitive pads alongside a selection of (very) low-key beats. And while it is by no means the most immediate piece here, it will no doubt curry favor as a compelling early doors transition, seemingly built for those oh-so-subtle yet completely essential increases of slow-building tension that separate the wheat from the chaff on warm up duty. “Picking Flowers For You (Off Major)” continues the low-lit red light theme, albeit adding a noticeably steadier pulse to the mix — again, great taut atmospherics that will ably assist early movement.

Perhaps most compelling of all is the wonderfully titled “March of the Cheese Crackers.” This one is a darker sub workout that will surely delight those enthralled by the recent murky subterranean kicks of Andy Stott, Samuel Kerridge et al. Hinging on a brutally de-tuned kick and weird, off-kilter stabs, the track shifts tempo throughout, laying down the gauntlet to more adventurous selectors. This really is a stellar EP from one of the more consistent characters in house music. The definition of a “producers’ producer,” David Moufang demonstrates he was — infuriatingly, effortlessly — producing music nearly 20 years ago that not only stands tall today, but is every bit as interesting, quirky, and timeless as the very best of his younger contemporaries.

Nick  on September 29, 2013 at 6:45 PM

Good as this stuff is, it makes me worry that electronic music has stopped moving forward, and indeed may have run out of places worth going. But some new talent will probably change my mind next week.

Trackbacks

Little White Earbuds September Charts 2013 – Little White Earbuds  on October 4, 2013 at 12:02 AM

[…] [Clone Royal Oak] 04. Prophet, “You Really Turn Me On” [Beat Electric] 06. Move D, “Picking Flowers For You (Off Major)” [Off Minor Recordings] 05. Pornojumpstart, “FORM_” [white] 07. The Stranger, […]

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