The White Lamp, It’s You

[Futureboogie Recordings]


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Bristol juggernaut-in-the-making Futureboogie spent their 2011 putting a decidedly sexy spin on house. While the tunes they’ve released, from the likes of Julio Bashmore and Behling & Simpson haven’t broken new musical ground, they represent a shift from the bottom-heavy, rhythmically wild party tunage we’ve come to associate with the UK’s youthful house-music scene. Rather than ratchet up the energy, Futureboogie releases use escalating sexual tension to loosen you up. And after making my way through The White Lamp’s “It’s You,” the latest from their camp, I had to check to make sure I was still wearing clothes.

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No word on who’s behind The White Lamp — its slinky beat and morning-after vocals could come from nearly anyone in the scene — but they obviously know what they’re doing: “It’s You” is pure but purposeful sex, indicating it’s obviously not their first time between the sheets. For all its smokiness, “It’s You” is never stoned: no matter how thick the air gets, its kick and snare break through without missing a beat, and the song lying at the heart of this club track is unquestionably strong. Crazy P’s Ron Basejam turns in a remix (more a “re-write,” really) that zones in even deeper, stripping away the original’s few excesses in a build-up to a subtly revamped second half. It’s the opposite approach to the one Eats Everything & Christophe take: their “Acid Ouse” rework basically forgets about The White Lamp’s song, superimposing chunks of the vocal on collage of Dance Mania references. If I have one complaint about the package, it’s that it feels a little safe, a point emphasized by the latter remix’s well-worn Chicago aesthetic. If I’m going to go somewhere I’ve been before, though, I’d much rather burrow into the warmth and assuredness of the original or Ron Basejam’s classy arrangement than something so brash. But hey, we’ve all got our own proclivities, if you know what I’m saying.

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