longchamp
jordan pas cher
tory burch outlet
tory burch outlet
ray ban australia
cheap jordan shoes
Michael Kors outlet
ray ban australia
Christian Louboutin Outlet
Babyliss
nike air max
cheap uggs
Michael Kors outlet
louis vuitton outlet
ghd hair straightener
toms outlet
ray ban outlet
cheap oakley sunglasses
nike air max
toms outlet
louis vuitton outlet
nike air max
coach outlet
nike pas cher
cheap uggs
nike outlet
mulberry outlet
cheap ugg boots
nike air max
Oakley Sunglasses australia
Roman Flügel, How to Spread Lies – Little White Earbuds

Roman Flügel, How to Spread Lies

[Dial]


Buy Vinyl
Buy MP3s

Whoever wrote Roman Flügel’s Discogs entry was right when they referred to him as a “chameleon.” The man’s been behind everything from big-room club hits to whimsical, serpentine house experiments, and remains as difficult to pin down as anyone working in dance music today. Nevertheless, a Flügel release on the Dial label is a perplexing prospect because Dial doesn’t exactly do chameleonic. Nuanced as it is, the label’s roster prides itself on consistent aesthetics, generally conforming to a specific bell-laden, bluesy atmosphere. How to Spread Lies exists in a space between Flügel’s catalog and that of the label; unquestionably more lighthearted than your average Lawrence release, the EP also contains some shades of sentimentality to appease skeptical Dial fans.

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

The title track is a mood piece; rhythmically a fairly basic 4/4, it mainly relies upon a selection of melodic elements: with soft bass tones, somber piano and chiming bells, the orchestration is classic Dial. A portamento synth line suavely escalates from this foundation, but things don’t go much farther than rubbing against pleasure centers. The similarly jazzy “Sunny Side Up” follows, a track that’s too short to make an impact — imagine one of Move D’s 10-minute workouts truncated into under four. A laid-back minimal house structure unexpectedly breaks into jazzy keys, but they seem to start noodling almost immediately, and there’s frustratingly not enough time to follow Flügel’s intentions. “Pattern 16″ is as mechanical as its title suggests, a bleepy, tightly-wound minimal composition that may work as a tool but, though playful, provides little in the way of hooks. The EP concludes with the beatless “Pianopiano,” which has entirely the opposite effect. It’s a tender, carefully restrained slice of indietronica, and the only successfully succinct piece here. Overall, How to Spread Lies feels like it would have benefited from Flügel fleshing out its sketches beyond familiar Dial blueprints.

biggiesmalls  on January 5, 2011 at 11:04 PM

thoroughly enjoyed this release from Roman

littlewhiteearbuds  on January 5, 2011 at 11:10 PM

I have to vouch for the title track at least. I used it in my set for Jordan’s radio show and still adore it. Then again it sounds a lot like Roman’s newfound labelmade, John Roberts, a sound I no doubt enjoy.

petepete  on January 6, 2011 at 6:29 AM

How To Spread Lies is amazing, one of the best tracks of 2010 if you ask me. Classy stuff.

Michael Walsh  on January 10, 2011 at 8:20 PM

I wonder if Steve has warmed to this release as I have? Title track is fantastic.. EP is solid all around. Loving this into 2011..

steve kerr  on January 11, 2011 at 6:13 PM

ehh, maybe a bit. i mean, i understand why people like it – it’s that floaty synth. just feels like too…obvious a hook, as far as i’m concerned.

Your email is never shared. Required fields are marked *

*
*